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14 Results

  • Restoring Riparian Zones of the Niagara River Project
    Filename: Niagara Parks PIC - Sept 2018 - Riparian Restoration.pdf
    Last Modified: Feb 19, 2019

    Over the next two years, this project will aim to create, restore, and expand up to 2 kilometres of vegetated shoreline buffers along the Niagara River through the removal of non-native species, where required, and the planting of a diversity of native plant species. Also, where possible, woody debris will be anchored at select locations within the river to soften the shoreline and provide suitable fish refuge and nursery habitat. In collaboration with Niagara College’s Ecosystem Restoration Program, priority areas for shoreline vegetation restoration have been identified for initial implementation.

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  • Service Rd 29 & 30 Rear Properties Restoration Plan
    Filename: Service Rd 29 & 30 Restoration.pdf
    Last Modified: Nov 30, 2018

    Due to Emerald Ash Borer infestation, a significant number of ash trees have been removed from Niagara Parks land directly behind the residences along service road 29 and 30. Property encroachment activities have also impacted the ecological integrity of this woodlot. Niagara Parks has developed a restoration planting plan behind these properties to control invasive species, as well as improve and support the ecosystem health. The plant materials are selected to provide a buffer of low-growing, ornamental, bird-attracting and berry producing shrubs that are fast growing native species to inhibit establishment of buckthorn and other invasive species. Additionally, trees of the same species as existing vegetation are used to infill or replace ash trees. In wet areas, wet-tolerant species for the wetland planting and butterfly/pollinator-attracting wildflowers for the meadow planting are proposed. The planting is scheduled for the Spring 2019.

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  • Designated Audubon Cooperative Sanctuary
    Filename: Niagara Parks PIC - Sept 2018 - Audubon.pdf
    Last Modified: Sep 28, 2018

    In February 2014, Niagara Parks’ Legends on the Niagara Golf Complex achieved designation as a “Certified Audubon Cooperative Sanctuary” through the Audubon Cooperative Sanctuary Program for Golf Courses. Niagara Parks has been working to achieve this designation with the Audubon International since 2004.

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  • Chippawa Grassland Bird Habitat Management Plan
    Filename: Niagara Parks PIC - Sept 2018 - Chippawa Grassland.pdf
    Last Modified: Sep 28, 2018

    With the drastic decline of grassland habitat and grassland bird populations throughout southern Ontario, there is an essential need to protect and enhance existing grasslands. The primary purpose of the Chippawa Grassland Bird Habitat Management Plan is to enhance existing grasslands on Niagara Parks property to support grassland dependent bird species.

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  • Emerald Ash Borer
    Filename: Niagara Parks PIC - Sept 2018 - EAB.pdf
    Last Modified: Sep 28, 2018

    The Emerald Ash Borer (EAB) is a non-native invasive insect that has killed millions of ash trees in southwestern Ontario and in the United States, and a confirmed infestation in Niagara Parks was confirmed in 2012. Infested ash trees die off within two to five years, posing a major economic and environmental threat to urban and forested areas.

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  • Environmental Stewardship
    Filename: Niagara Parks PIC - Sept 2018 - Environmental Stewardship.pdf
    Last Modified: Sep 28, 2018

    The Niagara Parks Commission is one of Ontario’s original environmental organizations. Since its founding in 1885, the NPC has served a mandate that includes the preservation of natural habitat along the Niagara River corridor from Lake Erie to Lake Ontario.

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  • Invasive Species Management
    Filename: Niagara Parks PIC - Sept 2018 - Invasive Species.pdf
    Last Modified: Sep 28, 2018

    Niagara Parks works on the front lines of the ongoing fight against invasive species. With lands stretching from Lake Erie to Lake Ontario along the Niagara River Corridor, Niagara Parks is often the first Canadian defence against emerging threats. Invasive species—plants, insects and animals—can have significant consequences for everything from wildlife habitat to the economy.

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  • Managing Species at Risk
    Filename: Niagara Parks PIC - Sept 2018 - Species at Risk.pdf
    Last Modified: Sep 28, 2018

    Niagara Parks is the steward of some of the highest concentrations of rare and endangered species in Ontario. From northern dusky salamanders to peregrine falcons and butternut trees, some of the province’s most at-risk species of flora and fauna survive because of habitats managed by Niagara Parks. Niagara Parks protects these species through a wide-ranging program of habitat conservation, collaborative research and public education.

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  • New Urban Forestry Management Plan
    Filename: Niagara Parks PIC - Sept 2018 - Urban Forestry.pdf
    Last Modified: Sep 28, 2018

    Stewarding Ontario’s urban forests has never been more important. With crises like the invasion of the emerald ash borer demonstrating vividly the fragility of our forests, we need to protect and sustain this vital aspect of our ecosystem. As part of its 2018-2028 Strategic Plan, the Niagara Parks Commission is developing a comprehensive Urban Forestry Management Plan. The plan is scheduled for final approval late in 2018, but key plan projects are already underway. The plan sets a number of research-based goals and strategies that will help Niagara Parks create a healthier and more resilient urban forest that supports wildlife and recreational opportunities, reduces pollution and helps mitigate the impacts of flooding, erosion and even climate change.

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  • Partnerships in Environmental Stewardship
    Filename: Niagara Parks PIC - Sept 2018 - Partnerships.pdf
    Last Modified: Sep 28, 2018

    In an ecosystem, the resilience and strength of the entire habitat depend on relationships. The same is true of Niagara Parks’ approach to environmental stewardship. Protecting, restoring and conserving the natural environment of the Niagara River Corridor is complex work that demands broad expertise, distinct abilities and diverse funding resources. That’s why so many of Niagara Parks’ environmental stewardship activities rely on the power of partnership.

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  • Niagara River Coastal Wetland Restoration Project
    Filename: Niagara Parks PIC - Sept 2018 - Coastal Wetland.pdf
    Last Modified: Sep 28, 2018

    The Niagara Parks Commission (NPC), in collaboration with the Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry (MNRF), is creating fish habitat along the Niagara River shoreline. This project contributes to the goals of the Niagara River Area of Concern – Remedial Action Plan, specifically addressing the loss of fish and wildlife habitat. This project also builds on NPC’s previous shoreline restoration projects which utilized bio-engineering techniques to mitigate shoreline erosion.

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  • Pollinator Garden Route
    Filename: Niagara Parks PIC - Sept 2018 - Pollinator Gardens.pdf
    Last Modified: Sep 28, 2018

    Building on the steadfast commitment to the environment and the preservation of the natural lands along the Niagara River Corridor, Niagara Parks established 12 pollinator gardens along the Niagara Parkway to provide habitat for pollinator species from bumblebees to hummingbirds, who play a crucial role in maintaining our environment. The gardens are connected through both the scenic Niagara Parkway and the Niagara River Recreation Trail, creating the Pollinator Garden Route which can be enjoyed by bicycle, foot, or automobile. Additional pollinator gardens will gradually be added to the Pollinator Garden Route as well.

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  • Niagara Parks Viewpoint Inventory
    Filename: Niagara Parks PIC - Sept 2018 - Viewpoint Inventory.pdf
    Last Modified: Sep 28, 2018

    The NPC is developing standards for its many Viewpoints along the Niagara River Corridor as one tactic for the management of the entire shoreline. These Viewpoint standards will help to create better and more sustainable views, and prioritize maintenance activities. The standards will also be used to identify new viewpoints or those that are unnecessary.

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  • Excellence in Environmental Stewardship Initiative
    Filename: EESI Poster.pdf
    Last Modified: Sep 25, 2018

    In April 2018, the Niagara Parks Commission (NPC) and Brock University’s Environmental Sustainability Research Centre (ESRC) developed a partnership called the Excellence in Environmental Stewardship Initiative (EESI). ESRC faculty, staff, and students work in partnership with NPC staff and the community to provide an evidence-based platform for NPC’s current and future environmental stewardship practices.

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